winter webs

Low res (pixelated) image of snow covered branches

Some people hate their neighbours. Others are best friends with them. Others simply tolerate them. Personally, I wouldn’t recognise mine even if they came and knocked at the door. We simply don’t coincide and I know nothing about them.

Actually, I found out something about them this last week that was rather reassuring.

I’m not tremendously house proud and I sometimes wonder if other people see this property and think I should take better care of it. Of course, there’s a limit to what I can do, as it’s rented and we only occupy a part of it. But I’m sure some of the near neighbours own their properties and it seems they aren’t quite as house proud as I might have expected.

hoar frost on spider's web

It took the recent frost to reveal their negligence. And I’m delighted that they don’t dust down their outdoor gates, as it gave me a chance to get these photographs of frosty spider’s webs.

hoar frost on spider's web

I was taught if you want to live and thrive, let the spider run alive. So although I will occasionally sweep down a cobweb from the studio ceiling before a client comes for a meeting, I tend to turn a blind eye to them in the rest of the house.

The neighbours seem to be working on a similar principal.

hoar frost on spiders' webs on wrought iron gate

As for the spinners, I certainly don’t disturb the ones in our yard, and for those who come indoors, except in summer, when I am glad to have one or two in residence to deal with flies, I have a “catch and release” policy. I think most of them are probably happier in the park over the road than they ever would be in my kitchen.

Mind you, I’ve been looking at the photos taken the next day, when it snowed and came across this one of a tree on the edge of the park. Now I’m a little concerned.

snowy branch and cable against night sky

I do hope that is simply a power cable or telephone wire looping through the tree tops. Much as I wish them well, I’m not sure I’d like the spiders I’ve set free to take quite so well to their new location.

Author: don't confuse the narrator

Exploring the boundary between writer and narrator through first person poetry, prose and opinion

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