ways and worlds

Tomorrow is the summer solstice, a time when the veil between worlds is supposed to grow thin.

I’ve read plenty of stories of people wandering unintentionally into the realm of the Fair Folk, but fewer that tell of deliberate trespass or offer instructions on how to find and open any of the doors between worlds.
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bright tomorrows

Despite the last week having been less-than-satisfactory on a number of counts, I woke this morning feeling surprisingly positive.

There was also a phrase – brand new bright tomorrow – going round and round in my mind.

And then I realised that today is the first day of summer.
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the long and the short of it

Yesterday was the solstice – the shortest day of the year.

Despite this traditionally being considered the start of winter, the days will now begin to get longer and the evenings will be brighter.

Then again, according to the Time and Date website today was less than a second longer than yesterday; I guess we’ll just have to wait a bit before we notice much difference.

autumn leaf on wooden table

a rose for summer

Apparently the summer solstice and the full moon coincide tonight, so here’s a white rose – a rose for summer and white for the moon.

white rose

White roses always make me think of this line in Laurie Lee’s Home From Abroad:

The hedges choke with roses fat as cream.

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the lion in autumn

It’s the second half of December and we are heading quickly towards the shortest day of the year. This year, though, the solstice isn’t until Tuesday 22nd, so talking about it today, Sunday, is a little premature – hence the post title, which gives me the excuse to post a picture of a lion:

lion relief carving

A quick look around online tells me that the word solstice is derived from the Latin, and combines the word sol, sun, and the word sistere, to stand or stop: it’s the moment when the sun seems to pause – the point when the year turns.
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