getting down to work

Wondering what to write to accompany yet another photograph of flowers, I searched through the blog for the word “rose”. The search also picked up words where “rose” is a substring – rosemary, primrose, arose and prose.

By chance, then, I came upon a post from 2012 called poetry, prose and politics, which contains the quotation from Mario Cuomo, former governor of the state of New York:

you campaign in poetry but you govern in prose.

Continue reading “getting down to work”

easy questions

A few days ago, a friend sent me a link to an article in the Guardian with the title Unlike life and the universe, Europe has no simple answer.

I’m not sure whether Europe itself has a simple answer, but the official referendum blurb that came through the door recently shows a question that can be answered very simply:

EU referendum question Should we remain in the EU or leave the EU?

That’s a very definite Yes from me. Or perhaps a very definite No.

a floral motif

Today, according to English tradition, is Primrose Day, which marks the anniversary of the death of the Conservative politician, Benjamin Disraeli.

primrose
Perhaps, after my recent foray into more political topics, I should note that my motives for posting are purely floral.

the best policy

The previous post was a bit of a political ramble and was nowhere near as popular as other recent ones that feature pretty photos and fragments of poetry, so let’s try again.

 brimstone butterfly
Continue reading “the best policy”

non-poetical

The DCTN strap-line is “(mostly) first-person poetry, prose and opinion” and I try and keep the blog more poetical than political. Of course, with the UK election looming, this is going to be more and more difficult; I suspect there’s more politics in poetry than there is poetry in politics.

So, recognising that politics are bound to enter into things sometime soon, I’ll get started with a few fairly random recent thoughts. First, a somewhat startling headline snipped from the BBC website:


Headline: Labour plans abuse
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500 million

After several days of glorious summer, the solid rain that woke me early this morning reminds me that “bad governments bring bad weather” and here in the UK it’s the day to head to the polling station.

Fifty pence coin sufragette commemorative issue
The BBC website reminds us:

On 22-25 May voters in the EU’s 28 member states will elect their representatives in Europe. Their choices will affect 500 million EU citizens.

The futures of 500 million people is a big responsibility; under our current system it is also a shared responsibility. I wasn’t really thinking of the bigger picture when I sent off my postal vote a few days ago; now I rather hope some of those voters in other countries are thinking more about me than I did about them.

 

news at the cutting edge

swiss army knife and pearl-handled penknife
There’s been a lot of talk this past week about “Tory knife crime plans”. (The plans under discussion are for mandatory prison sentences for anyone convicted twice for carrying a knife.)

News websites change rapidly, so one headline that particularly caught my attention – “Clegg attacks Tory knife crime plan” – is no longer to be found. I’d made a note of it, though, as that badly chosen verb “attack” bothered me.

For a bored subeditor, making up punny headlines can be fun, but I think there’s a point when serious news should be treated seriously. (True, my post title is slightly frivolous, but this is a personal blog not an official news provider.)
Continue reading “news at the cutting edge”