getting down to work

Wondering what to write to accompany yet another photograph of flowers, I searched through the blog for the word “rose”. The search also picked up words where “rose” is a substring – rosemary, primrose, arose and prose.

By chance, then, I came upon a post from 2012 called poetry, prose and politics, which contains the quotation from Mario Cuomo, former governor of the state of New York:

you campaign in poetry but you govern in prose.

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easy questions

A few days ago, a friend sent me a link to an article in the Guardian with the title Unlike life and the universe, Europe has no simple answer.

I’m not sure whether Europe itself has a simple answer, but the official referendum blurb that came through the door recently shows a question that can be answered very simply:

EU referendum question Should we remain in the EU or leave the EU?

That’s a very definite Yes from me. Or perhaps a very definite No.

a floral motif

Today, according to English tradition, is Primrose Day, which marks the anniversary of the death of the Conservative politician, Benjamin Disraeli.

primrose
Perhaps, after my recent foray into more political topics, I should note that my motives for posting are purely floral.

the best policy

The previous post was a bit of a political ramble and was nowhere near as popular as other recent ones that feature pretty photos and fragments of poetry, so let’s try again.

 brimstone butterfly
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non-poetical

The DCTN strap-line is “(mostly) first-person poetry, prose and opinion” and I try and keep the blog more poetical than political. Of course, with the UK election looming, this is going to be more and more difficult; I suspect there’s more politics in poetry than there is poetry in politics.

So, recognising that politics are bound to enter into things sometime soon, I’ll get started with a few fairly random recent thoughts. First, a somewhat startling headline snipped from the BBC website:


Headline: Labour plans abuse
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